EXAMINING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN UNDERGRADUATE NURSING STUDENTS’ STIGMA PERCEPTIONS AND THEIR MOTIVATION TO PROVIDE CARE TO PATIENTS WITH AT-RISK OPIOID USE.

Authors: Carolyn J. MacFarland; Khadejah F. Mahmoud, PhD(c), MSN; Ann M. Mitchell, PhD, RN, FAAN Faculty Mentor: Khadejah F. Mahmoud University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing 3500 Victoria St. Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Background: In 2017, opioid use was declared as a national emergency in need of immediate action. However, patients with at-risk opioid use are often not identified by health care providers. Nurses’ low motivation to work with patients with opioid use problems is considered a major barrier to identifying these patients, and can result in delaying their access to effective treatment. Understanding the relationship between opioid use related stigma perceptions and motivation to provide care to patients with these problems is imperative. Purpose: To examine the relationship between undergraduate nursing students’ stigma perceptions and their motivation to provide care to patients who have at-risk opioid use. Methods: A secondary analysis employing a cross-sectional design was used. A sample of 124 Junior-level nursing students enrolled in the Psychiatric-Mental Health course participated in the study. Students’ opioid use stigma perceptions were measured using adaptations from Corrigan’s (2003) and Link’s (1987) questionnaires including: Familiarity, Perceived Dangerousness, Fear, and Social Distance subscales. Meanwhile, students’ motivation was measured using adaptations from the Alcohol and Alcohol Problem Perception Questionnaire (AAPPQ). Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient analyses were used to examine the association between students’ stigma perceptions and their motivation scores. Results: The secondary analysis revealed that students’ motivation to provide care to patients with at-risk opioid use was positively associated with their familiarity (r=.242; p<.01) scores. Meanwhile, students’ motivation was negatively associated with their perceived dangerousness (r=-.221; p<.05) and fear (r=.286; p<.01) scores. Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of understanding how undergraduate nursing students’ opioid use stigma perceptions are associated with their motivation to provide care to this patient population. The findings of this study can provide the foundation for future interventions that can target nurses’ motivation through reducing their opioid use stigma perceptions.


Additional Abstract Information

Presenter: Carolyn MacFarland

Institution: University of Pittsburgh

Type: Poster

Subject: Nursing

Status: Approved


Time and Location

Session: Poster 8
Date/Time: Fri 2:45pm-3:45pm
Location: Wellness Center - Tripod 61 Side A