IMPACT OF A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT INTERVENTION ON NURSE BURNOUT IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

Lan Pham, Anne-Marie Shields, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 3550 Terrace Street Pittsburgh, PA 15261 Praewpannarai Buddadhumaruk-Sun, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 3550 Terrace Street Pittsburgh, PA 15261 Elke Brown, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 3550 Terrace Street Pittsburgh, PA 15261 Veronica Kozar, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 3550 Terrace Street Pittsburgh, PA 15261 Douglas White, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 3550 Terrace Street Pittsburgh, PA 15261 Anne-Marie Shields, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, 3550 Terrace Street Pittsburgh, PA 15261

Rationale Burnout is a consequence of extended exposure to mental, emotional, and physical exhaustion with insufficient time for recovery.1 A recent systematic review showed ethical issues and end-of-life decision-making to be among the most significant factors contributing to burnout among intensive care unit (ICU) professionals.1 Burnout has multiple negative consequences including lower levels of job satisfaction, higher turnover rates, and even poorer patient and professional health outcomes.1 The purpose of the study is to describe the prevalence of stress and determine if exposure to a quality improvement intervention was associated with reduced stress levels among ICU nurses as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Methods The intervention: PAiring Re-engineered ICU Teams with Nurse-driven Emotional Support and Relationship-building, or PARTNER promotes standardized nursing support, palliative care collaboration, general interdisciplinary teamwork, and interdisciplinary family meetings. The comparator is usual care. Pre- and post-burnout levels were assessed using the abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory, which examines four domains: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal accomplishment, and satisfaction with medicine. Results We invited 409 full-time registered nurses (RNs) across five urban Pennsylvania ICUs to participate in the survey. Overall, 369 (90%) consented and responded to the survey, with an 86% response rate (197/229) for the control arm and 96% (172/180) in the intervention arm. Participants were primarily Caucasian and female, with greater than one year of ICU nursing and a range of religious preferences (Table 1). Conclusion Four of five sites have completed the post-study inventory, with the study ending April 2018. We hypothesize that RNs in the PARTNER group will have lower mean scores for emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and higher scores for personal accomplishment and satisfaction with medicine. References 1Chuang C-H, Tseng P-C, Lin C-Y, Lin K-H, Chen Y-Y. Burnout in the intensive care unit professionals: A systematic review. Medicine. 2016;95(50), 1-12. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000005629.


Additional Abstract Information

Presenter: Lan Pham

Institution: University of Pittsburgh

Type: Oral

Subject: Nursing

Status: Approved


Time and Location

Session: Oral 7
Date/Time: Fri 1:30pm-1:50pm
Location: Old North 211
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