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Fabrication and Mechanical Characterization of PCL Flow Diverters

Seth Harriet and Dr. Mohammad Hossan, Dr. Mohammad Hossan, University of Central Oklahoma Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Central Oklahoma, 100 North University Drive, Edmond OK, 73034.

An aneurysm is a localized dilation of blood vessel which can cause it to swell out beyond control and eventually to rupture if not treated. Recently, flow diverters (FD) are widely used as an endovascular treatment to dissolve aneurysms. However, studies show that the permanent placement of metallic FDs are the source of constant mild-inflammation and can cause late thrombosis, in-stent stenosis, and stroke. This poster presents a novel fabrication method and mechanical testing of biodegradable PCL (Poly-ε-caprolactone) flow diverters. FDs were designed as a 3D CAD model and relevant python code was developed to use in a New Port 3- axis micromotion stage. A precision circular rotating arm was designed and programmed using an Arduino microcontroller. The medical grade PCL filament was fed into an electomelt needle extruder with adjusted feed rate. Thin PCL microfiber was deposited on the rotating circular arm based on the python codes and flow diverters were formed. The pore sizes, fiber diameters and surface quality were evaluated using the SEM and 3D profilometers. Results show that the extruder temperature and feed rate have a direct impact to the surface quality. The FDs with larger pores are more flexible both radially and longitudinally. The pore pattern also influences the mechanical flexibility of FDs. The pores created with longitudinal lines are more flexible than the pores created with circular lines. These findings will help optimize the process parameters and development of functional PCL based biodegradable flow diverters for safer and more efficient treatment of aneurysms.




Additional Abstract Information

Presenter: Seth Harriet

Institution: University of Central Oklahoma

Type: Poster

Subject: Biological & Chemical Engineering

Status: Approved


Time and Location

Session: Poster 2
Date/Time: Mon 3:00pm-4:00pm
Session Number: 2545