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What is Happening in the Black Community? Understanding African Americans’ Sickle Cell Disease (SCD)

Reginae Butler, Dr. Flora Wei, Mass Media Arts, Clark Atlanta University, 223 James P. Brawley Dr. SW, Atlanta, GA 30314 Paige Hall Dr. Flora Wei, Mass Media Arts, Clark Atlanta University, 223 James P. Brawley Dr. SW, Atlanta, GA 30314 Kiara Cook Dr. Flora Wei, Mass Media Arts, Clark Atlanta University, 223 James P. Brawley Dr. SW, Atlanta, GA 30314 Ebonie Farmer Dr. Flora Wei, Mass Media Arts, Clark Atlanta University, 223 James P. Brawley Dr. SW, Atlanta, GA 30314

Sickle cell disease (SCD) predominates in sub-Saharan Africa, East Mediterranean areas, Middle East, and India. Nigeria, and mostly populous Black communities in the world. It is rare for non-African Americans to pay attention to SCD, and some people in other ethnicities might not hear about it at all. To promote health campaigns in the global village, Global Blood Therapeutics (GBT) is directing a national campaign to raise awareness and understanding of sickle cell disease. Due to SCD not being viewed by society as a prominent disease and less use of media to deliver advocacy messages, many people are unaware or misinformed of the disease. Hence, the purpose of this study is to investigate people’s understanding about the SCD campaign.

Participants (N = 120) were college students between the age range of 19 and 49 (M= 22.28, SD= 4.64) who were recruited from a small private Historical Black College and University (HBCU) to participate in a cross-sectional anonymous survey study. The results revealed that there was a difference between people who are aware of the Global Blood Therapeutics program and people who are not aware of the program with respect to their understanding of the SCD disease [M = 2.77, SD = 0.96; t(116) = 2.34, p < .05]. Pearson product-moment correlation test was used to test the linear relationship between frequency of hearing about sickle cell disease and understanding the risks associated with sickle cell disease. The result also showed that there was a strong positive correlation between the two variables [r = .47, n = 120, p < .05]. By applying the knowledge gap theory, when people from Black communities who gain more information about sickle cell disease from global health campaigns, they are more likely to increase their understanding the risks associated with SCD.




Additional Abstract Information

Presenters: Reginae Butler, Ebonie Farmer , Kiara Cook, Paige Hall

Institution: Clark Atlanta University

Type: Poster

Subject: Communications

Status: Approved


Time and Location

Session: Poster 4
Date/Time: Tue 11:00am-12:00pm
Session Number: 3655