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Health Locus of Control Beliefs and Other Correlates of Adherence to the Medical Regimen After Lung Transplantation

Alexia Coutsouridis, Dr. Annette Devito Dabbs, and Yumi Ma, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, 3500 Victoria Street, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213

Background: Adherence to the medical regimen optimizes health outcomes after lung transplantation. Recipients' health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs may influence their adherence after transplant. Beliefs include that their health is within their own control (internality),  under the control of others (externality), or is up to chance. The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between recipients’ HLOC beliefs and other characteristics at the time of transplant, and adherence to the post-transplant medical regimen during the first year post-transplant to identify recipients needing guidance to sustain their regimens. 

Methods: The study used a longitudinal, descriptive correlational design. The sample included 201 lung transplant recipients participating in a mobile health self-management intervention trial. Sample characteristics assessed include socio-demographics, levels of HLOC,  psychological distress, perceptions of self-care agency, and quality of caregiver support. Adherence to the post-transplant medical regimen was assessed at 2,6, and 12 months post-transplant.  Bivariate correlations were estimated among HLOC beliefs, other baseline characteristics, and post-transplant adherence. 

Results: Recipients reported HLOC beliefs in descending order of frequency (externality, internality and chance). Weak but significant correlations were found among the three types of HLOC beliefs (r= .124-.196, p < 0.05). A significant, negative point-biserial correlation was found between HLOC external and male gender (rpb= -.117 ,p=<.05). No significant correlations were found between HLOC beliefs and other characteristics at the time of transplant or adherence to the medical regimen after transplant. Statistically significant correlations were found between the presence of psychological distress and adherence at all three time points (r= 0.21-.24, p < .01)

Conclusions: Characteristics such as the presence of psychological distress are more likely to influence adherence to the medical regimen after lung transplantation than socio-demographics or HLOC beliefs. More research is needed to explore the factors that influence adherence.

 




Additional Abstract Information

Presenter: Alexia Coutsouridis

Institution: University of Pittsburgh

Type: Poster

Subject: Nursing & Public Health

Status: Approved


Time and Location

Session: Poster 9
Date/Time: Wed 12:00pm-1:00pm
Session Number: 6024